Apr 17 2014

The Flipped Classroom

Posted by Amy Kitchens at 3:12 PM
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- Categories: Teaching Tips

You may have heard of flipping the classroom as a model for active learning that works well in graduate level courses. It is not new, and some instructors are already practicing it here at JHSPH, but I often get questions about how to more effectively add these techniques into a course. Instructors want to know how much time it takes and if it is worth the effort. 

The flipped classroom is really just a way of making the most of face-to-face class time. Particularly with an eight week term, efficacy in short amounts of time is really important. When students leave your classroom, what is it that you want them to be able to do? Recite a few key points that they picked up from the readings and lectures? Or do you want them to have a deeper level of understanding and the confidence that comes from having applied their learning and worked through complicated problems? Flipping the classroom can help achieve this second outcome. Usually it works like this: there is some homework assigned, maybe even before the first day of class. It can be reading, watching a lecture, or listening to a podcast, something passive where students are getting the background information they need to be able to be an active participant in class. This prepares students to engage in class, and also gives them some confidence that they have some basis for participating when the time comes. Once in class, there are various activities that range from discussion, to group work, to case studies and problem solving, or even letting students teach a section, all of these help students to get a more memorable experience out of the course.

A key to success in the flipped classroom is setting student expectations up front. Letting students know what is expected of them and why you are doing what you are doing. This allows students to take a more active role in their education, and ultimately, get more out of the course. 

My colleagues and I are happy to talk in more detail about your specific courses and questions about implementing a similar model in your classroom. Drop by E5620, Wednesdays from 10-12 or Thursdays from 1:30-3:30, or come by any time and pick up a handout from our office door. 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

Findlay-Thompson, S., & Mombourquette, P. (2013). EVALUATION OF A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IN AN UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS COURSE. Global Conference On Business & Finance Proceedings8(2), 138-145.

Bergmann, J., Overmyer, J., Wilie, B. (Aprils, 2012). The flipped class: What it is and what it is not. Retrieved from http://www.thedailyriff.com/articles/the-flipped-class-conversation-689.php

 

For even more information on the topic:

Additional Flipped Classroom Resources Including an Infographic

May 8th Inside Higher Ed The Flipped Classroom Webinar

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